Thursday, April 23, 2020

Book Review: 'Atlanta's Concealment of the Baby Gun Club Landfill' by Jerry Brow

Atlanta's Concealment of the Baby Gun Club Landfill by Jerry Brow

‘It is what we can’t see that is killing us’

Georgia author Jerry Brow is an environmentalist of the first order, a licensed builder and international developer, founder of the Humanitarian Medical Relief, Ayuda Medica Humanitaria, co-founder of Exxposed.org, and founder of OurPublicTrust.com. His mission: ‘to get the people of our world to unite and start talking freely about the dependence upon our government [federal, state and municipal] for the public’s air, water, and land.’ His commitment is distilled in this exemplary book that demands transparency from the government in protecting matters of public health and safety.

In one of the more enlightening books about protecting our environment, Jerry Brow courageously presents facts in the form of documents, photographs, letters and commentary about government neglect in safeguarding the public against toxic landfills. His writing is clearly credible as he shares his immediate impact of such neglect. To clarify the title of this book, the following definition is extracted from the text – a document that defines and presents the prĂ©cis for Jerry’s writing.

‘The Gun Club Landfill is located in Fulton County, Georgia, approximately 6 miles west of downtown Atlanta. The site is located in an urban area with residential areas adjoining the site on its north and east sides, it is bordered by Procter Creek on the
North and East. The landfill property encompasses approximately 128 acres, and beginning in 1968 was as a sanitary landfill. Environmental Protection Division permitted the site as a nonhazardous municipal landfill in 1977(solid waste handling permits number 666—026D(SL).’ And therein lies the rub…

As he states in his author’s note, ‘After eight years, Jerry Brow and his family were ambushed by all three levels of the government because he stumbled upon the things
the government doesn’t want its people to know about. All these tragic events ended in Jerry having to turn over four of his properties due to condemnation by the local government to the city that was found to have created an illegal hazardous waste dump, then concealed the site for decades, while it still contaminates the water, the air, and the
land.’

The manner in which Jerry tenaciously unfolds this drama about the government’s lack of protection for the public in unsafe situations and its concealment of same, such as this dangerous landfill tragedy, makes for a blisteringly impressive testament. All aspects of the misadventure on the government’s part are detailed, and are blended successfully with the personal aspects, both from the author’s stance and the public in general, and make this a book that serves as a profoundly important call for transparency and justice. This is an important book on many levels, a fine call to action! Highly recommended.







Editor's note: This review has been published with the permission of Grady Harp. Like what you read? Subscribe to the SFRB's free daily email notice so you can be up-to-date on our latest articles. Scroll up this page to the sign-up field on your right.