Thursday, January 24, 2019

Book Review: 'Bitter Frost (Frost, #1)' by Kailin Gow

Bitter Frost by Kailin Gow
Dreams represent part of our unconsciousness – where we store the true parts of our soul.’

California author/filmmaker Kailin Gow has worked as an Exec in charge of Legal and Production at Walt Disney Company, a writer/producer for Cable Television, an Exec at high tech start ups, an Exec at Fortune 100 Hotel and Travel Corporations, a model, a tour director, journalist, re-organization consultant, and secret shopper. She holds a Masters Degree in Communications Management from USC and Drama/Film and Social Ecology Degrees from UC Irvine. Now combining her highly successful career as an author and filmmaker Kailin uses her personal life's adversities into an inspiration and drive to write empowering books and stories for girls and women of all ages.

Though Kailin’s popular books of recent publication have established her as a high romance lover, this novel for Young Adults dates back to 2010. Toning her at times steamy writing down so that the audience for which it is intended is respected, the book reads so well that adults of all ages will find it satisfying – especially in this era when almost all movies embrace science fiction on some level.

The warmth of her style is evident from the opening – ‘It was not the best day for a birthday. The sky was misty and full of rain – clouds looked as full and wet and ready to drip as kitchen sponges. I woke up with a headache, in a feverish sweat. The dream again. A prince in disguise. A melodious dance. The Minotaur, all eyes, all teeth. I tried to shake the images out of my brain.. “Mom!” I called out. There was no answer. This was strange. There was a tradition in my family – every morning on my birthday, my mother would surprise me with a birthday breakfast in bed; banana pancakes with cinnamon and chocolate powder swirl. It was her way of trying to put some weight on me. “Mom?” Maybe she had overslept. I briefly considered bringing her breakfast in bed, to tease her. I crept into her room. It was empty. “Mom?” my calls ricocheted around the rooms of our house, but there was no answer. I was alone….’ And so the mystery starts.

To explore the novel, the synopsis is a fine guide: ‘All her life, Breena had always dreamed about fairies as though she lived among them...beautiful fairies living among mortals and living in Feyland. In her dreams, he was always there the breathtakingly handsome but dangerous Winter Prince, Kian, who is her intended. When Breena turns sixteen, she begins seeing fairies and other creatures mortals don t see. Her best friend Logan, suddenly acts very protective. Then she sees Kian, who seems intent on finding her and carrying her off to Feyland. That's fine and all, but for the fact that humans rarely survive a trip to Feyland, a kiss from a fairy generally means death to the human unless that human has fairy blood in them or is very strong, and although Kian seemed to be her intended, he seems to hate her and wants her dead.

Much of the pleasure in reading this book is the wonder and realm of dreamlike possibilities we all wish we could discover. Solid writing lifting what could be a glitzy fantasy tale into a higher realm of character sensitivity, it is not surprising that this young lady is becoming a force in contemporary literature and film.







Editor's note: This review has been published with the permission of Grady Harp. Like what you read? Subscribe to the SFRB's free daily email notice so you can be up-to-date on our latest articles. Scroll up this page to the sign-up field on your right.