Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Book Review: 'The High Price I Had To Pay' by Jamila T. Davis


New York Author Jamila T. Davis, in addition to having published seven books, is a motivational speaker and the creator of the Voices of Consequences Enrichment Series for incarcerated women. Davis is no stranger to triumphs and defeats. By the age of 25, she utilized her business savvy and street smarts to rise to the top of her field, becoming a lead go-to person in the Hip-Hop Music Industry and a self-made millionaire through real estate investments. All seemed well until the thorn of materialism clouded Davis' judgments and her business shortcuts backfired, causing her self-made empire to crumble. Davis was convicted of bank fraud, for her role in a multi-million dollar bank fraud scheme, and sentenced to 12 1/2 years in federal prison. Davis' life was in a great shambles as she faced the obstacle of imprisonment. While living in a prison cell, stripped of all her worldly possessions, and abandoned by most of her peers, she was forced to deal with the root of her dilemmas- her own inner self. Davis searched passionately for answers and strategies to heal and regain her self-confidence, and to discover her life's purpose. She utilized her formal training from Lincoln University, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, along with her real-life post-incarceration experiences and documented her discoveries. Revealing the tools, techniques and strategies she used to heal, Davis composed a series of books geared to empower women.

It is not often that biographical material sets a book into motion as well as does Jamila’s bio, but then that is what this excellent book is about – her experiences with the world of corruption that she shares with such fluid style that we can almost hear the filmmakers beating a path to her door.

The synopsis, though worthy, is too brief to explore the impact of her writing. ‘THE HIGH PRICE I HAD TO PAY is a captivating real-life story that reveals another aspect of the inside fraud perpetrated by Lehman executives that has yet to be told! Years before the 2008 Financial Crisis, a major epidemic of mortgage fraud surged throughout the country. The FBI geared up to combat the problem, imprisoning thousands who alleged to have victimized Wall Street giants, such as Lehman Brothers. Hidden safely behind the auspices of being a "victim," savvy Ivy League bank executives created additional fraudulent schemes to further their profit. Utilizing their "victimizers" as scapegoats, the bankers' clever plan went undetected. Consequently, the real architects of the massive fraudulent lending schemes escaped unpunished. And the "small fries," who the bankers blamed, were left to do big time!’

A thriller of a novel, though fact and not fiction, this book is a fast read and represents the lifting of the curtain on so many injustices that one started it is difficult not to identify with Jamila’s finely wrought story. Highly recommended. Grady Harp, November 15







Editor's note: This review has been published with the permission of Grady Harp. Like what you read? Subscribe to the SFRB's free daily email notice so you can be up-to-date on our latest articles. Scroll up this page to the sign-up field on your right.

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