Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Book Review: 'The Electra Conspiracy' by Elizabeth Revill


Welsh author Elizabeth Revill qualified in English, Speech and Drama before moving onto Drama School and embracing a career as an actress. As a member of the BBC Repertory Company she worked extensively in radio, television and in theatres all over the country from Scotland to Plymouth both on Commercial and Classical tours as well as Repertory seasons in Birmingham, Worthing, Lancaster, Peterborough, Worcester, Second City and others. She moved to Devon where she taught English, and History at GCSE level. She also specialized in teaching Special Needs children. Coupled with directing and teaching Drama at Drama Schools in Birmingham and Maidenhead, Elizabeth has written a number of plays. Her novels in the psychological thriller trilogy are, Killing me Softly, Prayer for the Dying and God Only Knows. Elizabeth now lives in North Devon and writes full time.

Elizabeth understands how to build tension in her novels that focus on intrigue, suspense and conspiracy. Interestingly for this novel she focuses attention on the death of Princess Diana. S she states in her author’s note, ‘The circumstances surrounding the death of Princess Diana were nothing if not controversial. Conspiracy theories abounded from claims of Government plots to much, much more. Rumors raged after her death and the press was very keen to play up to this. Many television programs sought to investigate the truth behind her death and although many doubts were cast on the accident, none came up with a totally satisfactory explanation to this tragedy.” And that is the seed that once planted produced this gripping novel.

The complex plot summary shares, ‘British filmmakers Amy Wilde and Jon Curtis just want to make an entertaining documentary about Electra, a pop icon famous for her singing voice and strong opinions about capital punishment and the sale of land mines. Unfortunately, for Amy and Jon, they've chosen the wrong singer at the wrong time. The Brandenburg Sect, a secret group of top Western politicians and businessmen who generally get what they want, decide Electra has to go; her subversive views are too popular with the masses. The Sect has already interfered once in Electra's relationship with the heir to the British throne. Now she is dating a wealthy, powerful Saudi. Security forces under the Sect's control use captured convicted murderers and terrorists to kill for their side on command. Triggers for these re-programmed assassins have been set in Electra's musical recordings. Electra is close to discovering this misuse of her musical tracks when she dies in a fiery crash in a London tunnel while being chased by paparazzi. Investigations reveal a conspiracy, which Amy and Jon are determined to uncover and use in their film. They are soon marked people targeted by security services with their bank accounts frozen and identities stolen. In a race against the clock, can Amy and Jon alert the public to the truth before they too are eliminated? Or will the, not so faceless, men in black win the day? Security forces under the Sect's control use captured convicted murderers and terrorists to kill for their side on command. Triggers for these re-programmed assassins have been set in Electra's musical recordings. Electra is close to discovering this misuse of her musical tracks when she dies in a fiery crash in a London tunnel while being chased by paparazzi. Investigations reveal a conspiracy, which Amy and Jon are determined to uncover and use in their film. They are soon marked people targeted by security services with their bank accounts frozen and identities stolen. In a race against the clock, can Amy and Jon alert the public to the truth before they too are eliminated? Or will the, not so faceless, men in black win the day?’

With political conspiracies in the headlines and information about terrorists linked to hacking private information, Elizabeth has found a solid premise for her well-written story. She has succeeded in molding a very fine conspiracy tale. Grady Harp, June 16







Editor's note: This review has been published with the permission of Grady Harp. Like what you read? Subscribe to the SFRB's free daily email notice so you can be up-to-date on our latest articles. Scroll up this page to the sign-up field on your right.

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