Monday, January 15, 2018

Book Review: 'The Highlander’s Bride Trouble' by Mary Wine

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This was my first time experiencing a highlander story, and it was well worth it. Nareen and Saer definitely have a story that entertains between Nareen’s reluctance to marry any man, Saer’s duty to re-build his lands, and the enemies whom seem to be adding up. This story never had a dull moment.
One thing that struck me from the very beginning was that Nareen was definitely not your quiet, demure woman. She was spitfire who challenged anyone who she felt infringed on her freedom. She knew who she was, and that she did not fit into the ideal female of the time, but that did not stop her from being who she was no matter what, even if it meant being alone the rest of her life. This also made her stubborn at times, and blind to what was so obvious to me, that Saer would never want to change the part of her he loved most: her spirit. I found Nareen to be the ideal heroine because she can take care of herself if need be. She will be with a man because she wants him, not because she needs him.
Saer is the right man to not restrict Nareen.  Instead, he helps her realize that he wants her for who she is no matter the cost. He understands her reservations since he has his own dicey childhood, which only shows him that they are kindred hearts. I like that Saer was firm when needed with Nareen, but also knew when to back off or be sweet and gentle with her. It was clear to me he was a keeper and a man any wife would treasure. Plus his savage side was necessary in keeping his people safe, yet never consumed him or made him cruel.
The multiple plotlines in the story really keep me on the edge of my seat from beginning to end.  Whether it was the bratty mistress Abigail, or the fight for respect among their people, Nareen and Saer never seemed to have it easy, which really helped to push the story line, and their relationship, right along. While this may have been my first highlander story it definitely makes me want to pick up others and see if they are just as entertaining and all consuming as this one.



Editor's note: This article was originally published at Long and Short ReviewsIt has been republished with permission. Like what you read? Subscribe to the SFRB's free daily email notice so you can be up-to-date on our latest articles. Scroll up this page to the sign-up field on your right.

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