Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Book Review: 'The Bride Who Got Lucky' by Janna MacGregor



The Bride Who Got Lucky can be categorized as friends to lovers romance novel. Nicholas St. Mauer and Lady Emma Cavensham have known each other for a long time. Nicholas saved Emma from her own adventure once and then he gave her a present; in return he got a kiss from her. But years passed before the two of them are thrown together again. Although neither of them wanted to get married, destiny has other plans for them.
The Bride Who Got Lucky is a magnificent story. It is rich and beautifully written. It goes beyond romantic pursuit between the hero and heroine. Once I started to read it I just could not put it down. There are many things that make this novel great. The plot makes this more than just another historical romance novel. It combines romance, adventure and social issues. In the novel the author deals with the status of women in society and she raises the issue of domestic violence. These topics are well incorporated into the story and added value to it. Furthermore, the novel is part of a series, yet it can be read as a standalone. The minor references to the previous titles in the series can be disregarded and the reader can fully enjoy this story.
As for the characters, the hero is amazing and the heroine is larger than life, feisty and a blue stocking all at the same time. The hero, Nicholas St. Mauer, has a bit of a father issue. He lives in the past due to some unresolved issues between him and his father but it is also what makes him the way he is. The heroine, Lady Emma Cavensham, is a lady ahead of her time. She bends rules and she uses her social status for a good cause. She is driven by guilt and there were moments in the story when she did something very impulsive and got herself into trouble. But she genuinely wants to help women, so for me Emma was a great character and is so different from many other historical romance novel heroines.
All in all this is amazing and complex story that I highly recommend.





Editor's note: This article was originally published at Long and Short ReviewsIt has been republished with permission. Like what you read? Subscribe to the SFRB's free daily email notice so you can be up-to-date on our latest articles. Scroll up this page to the sign-up field on your right.

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