Thursday, April 27, 2017

Book Review: Injustice: Why Social Inequality Still Persists by Danny Dorling

Editor's note: This review was originally published in The London School of Economics Review of Books, and has been reposted with permission. It is available under Creative Commons and the original page can be found here

Book Review: Dealing With China: An Insider Unmasks the New Economic Superpower by Henry Paulson

Editor's note: This review was originally published in The London School of Economics Review of Books, and has been reposted with permission. It is available under Creative Commons and the original page can be found here

Book Review: Islamic State: The Digital Caliphate by Abdel Bari Atwan

Editor's note: This review was originally published in The London School of Economics Review of Books, and has been reposted with permission. It is available under Creative Commons and the original page can be found here

Book Review: The Europeanisation of Contested Statehood: The EU in Northern Cyprus by George Kyris

Editor's note: This review was originally published in The London School of Economics Review of Books, and has been reposted with permission. It is available under Creative Commons and the original page can be found here

Book Review: 'The Making of Donald Trump' by David Cay Johnston

Editor's note: This review was originally published at the Daily Kos, which notes that its "content may be used for any purpose without explicit permission unless otherwise specified." The original page can be found here

Painting of the Day: 'A Pompeian Lady' by John William Godward



A Pompeian Lady by John William Godward, 1915

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Interview: Christopher Whalen explains how 'flyover America' pushed Donald Trump over the top


This is the second part of my discussion with Christopher Whalen. The first piece is available. 
Story by Joseph Ford Cotto
As always, there is a lot going on in Washington, DC nowadays. No small measure of it relates to money, but not necessarily campaign spending.
How Donald Trump and, to a lesser extent, his administrative personnel -- along with Republicans on Capitol Hill -- handle the economy will make or break this presidency's legacy. Trump promised a great deal to his supporters, and managed to unilaterally see through some of his pledges, but found congressional-slash-judicial opposition toward others.
Most intriguing is that Trump tied the seemingly non-fiscal matter of immigration to his economic platform. Foreign trade, while more relevant to national wages than border patrol hirings, has traditionally been in the realm of international policy. Trump broke from precedent by tying it to the average American's quality of life.
Politics have not been the same since, and it seems unlikely that they will revert to business-as-usual anytime in the foreseeable future. 

Book Review: 'Chain of Title: How Three Ordinary Americans Uncovered Wall Street’s Great Foreclosure Fraud' by David Dayen

Editor's note: This review was originally published at the Daily Kos, which notes that its "content may be used for any purpose without explicit permission unless otherwise specified." The original page can be found here